Unfortunately, the 2Checkout dashboard is a bit limited in scope, making it difficult to get any metrics on conversion rates or even sorting by commission payouts. The workaround is to go to the Avangate store, which does list their best-selling products, and then search for these on the affiliate dashboard. That being said, 2Checkout does offer products from more than 4,000 different vendors, making it the leading affiliate network for software and digital products.
I am a HUGE fan of the “freemium” business model. Wealthy Affiliate follows that model by offering a free membership account. The free membership gives you limited access in the Wealthy Affiliate dashboard. Some of your access lasts forever, such as some of the training videos and community features, while other features only last for a limited time, such as the live chat feature. Here is what you get with the free Wealthy Affiliate Membership:
MaxBounty works exclusively with digital products, usually about giving one’s email or signing up for a newsletter. MaxBounty has CPA, Pay-per-call, and CPL campaigns that you can choose from. MaxBounty is involved in a large number of verticals, including market research, real estate, social games, finance, dating, and diet, but is primarily designed for marketers seeking to acquire new leads. 

Leadpages also offers an option for affiliates to send referrals to attend a Leadpages webinar with standard commissions paid for any sale generated from the webinar. However, Leadpages requires you to get at least 150 people to sign up (but not necessarily attend) each webinar. Leadpages also offers affiliates the ability to view blog posts and videos on Leadpages’s site, again with the standard commission paid for any sales.
My intent isn’t to make this Wealthy Affiliate review yet another digital sales pitch. As I searched for Wealthy Affiliate reviews, I noticed the vast majority of them are very one-sided, don’t offer any other options, and are simply biased sales pitches from affiliate marketers trying to make a buck. So, in MY Wealthy Affiliate  review, I’m going to do things a bit differently. Here are some of the topics I’d like to cover…
Being in Australia, I’m not required to do anything by the law (although I hear talk that there may be changes around this). I don’t disclose every single Amazon link on my photography blog in a direct way but do I have a disclaimer/disclosure page on the blog. When I’m doing a ‘best seller list’ always include a disclaimer on those posts as the whole page is filled with affiliate links. I have also written numerous times on DPS about how the links to Amazon earn us money and help the site to keep growing and be free.
…But doesn’t being an affiliate for Wealthy Affiliate make me just another one of those affiliate marketers who is being biased and just trying to make a buck off of you? Well, ummmm…. Sort of! But at least I’m honest about it, right? I hope you give me a chance by continuing to read this Wealthy Affiliate review. I have no intention of making this one big sales pitch. I just want to provide you with the information and allow you to make your own decision. If I get a commission, great! If not, that’s ok too. Here’s a screenshot of my Wealthy Affiliate profile.
Earning income via Target affiliates, however, requires a bit of work. Cookies expire in just seven days, and commissions can be as low as just one percent, so you’ll need to be operating a high-traffic website in order to make serious cash with this program. But with Target’s much-beloved brand reputation and vast catalog, relevant product links can be a big earner for established influencers.
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